DC’s Rebirth – cool or not cool? Part 1/2: Flash and Batman

In 2011, when DC ‘rebooted’ all of their comic book series (‘The New 52’), their sales figures improved drastically, at least for the first 1-2 years or so. Recently, with sales back on a low level, they must have thought: if it worked once, it must work twice. So DC relaunched/renumbered every title once again (with Action Comics and Detective Comics going back to their old issue numbers in the 900s), and indeed sales are up again. However, this ‘Rebirth’ is – once again – not a clean reboot. The stories don’t start from scratch, but rely on previously established continuity, or at least on bits and pieces of it. Are the Rebirth comics intended as jumping-on points for new readers, or to ‘fix’ continuity for old readers? Or will nobody be able to make sense of them? Let’s find out by looking at some of these new titles. Disclaimer: I have read neither Flashpoint nor Convergence, the two crossover events that bookend The New 52, which would have probably made it easier to understand what’s going on in Rebirth.

The starting point for it all is the prequel one-shot, DC Universe Rebirth:

panel detail from DC Universe Rebirth #1

DC Universe Rebirth #1

Language: English
Authors: Geoff Johns (writer), Gary Frank, Ivan Reis, Ethan van Sciver and Phil Jimenez (artists)
Publisher: DC
Cover date: July 2016
Pages: 66

Price: $2.99
Website: http://www.dccomics.com/comics/dc-universe-rebirth-2016/dc-universe-rebirth-1

“There’s something wrong with history. Someone has infected it and you all forgot things”, says Wally West (one of currently at least three characters named The Flash), who had been trapped inside the Speed Force. So both what happened before Flashpoint as well as what happened in The New 52 is ‘in continuity’ now, but this infection of time and memory loss are supposed to explain why everything was suddenly different in The New 52. DC Universe Rebirth is one big retconning attempt that even incorporates the Golden Age Justice Society of America, Crisis on Infinite Earths, and Watchmen. Which shouldn’t make things easier for new readers, but let’s see…

For each new/relaunched series there is a prequel titled …: Rebirth, e.g. for The Flash:

panel detail from The Flash: Rebirth #1

The Flash: Rebirth #1

Language: English
Authors: Joshua Williamson (writer), Carmine di Giandomenico (artist), Ivan Plascencia (colourist)
Publisher: DC
Cover date: August 2016
Pages: 20

Price: $2.99
Website: http://www.dccomics.com/comics/the-flash-2016/the-flash-rebirth-1

The Flash is at the center of the Rebirth crossover event, so it makes sense to begin with his series. This series, like its New 52 predecessor, starts centered on Barry Allen, not Wally West. It then repeats the scene where Wally West manages to escape from the Speed Force and meet Barry Allen. However, instead of simply reprinting the two pages in question, they are redrawn by di Giandomenico, with the text remaining unchanged. It’s a rare treat to see a part of the same script handled by two different art teams, so there’s no reason for the reader to feel cheated here. As for the story, not much happens. Wally does some more explaining/retconning: “There are pieces of our memory missing from both of us. They didn’t just take time – they took our lives, they took our friendships, our loves…”

The Flash #1

Language: English
Authors: Joshua Williamson (writer), Carmine di Giandomenico (artist), Ivan Plascencia (colourist)
Publisher: DC
Cover date: September 2016
Pages: 20

Price: $2.99
Website: http://www.dccomics.com/comics/the-flash-2016/the-flash-1

This comic shifts the focus back to Barry Allen again, and to yet another Flash, confusingly also named Wally West, who apparently had already been introduced at some point in the New 52 Flash series. While the other Wally West, together with Batman, continues to investigate this whole Rebirth mystery off-panel, an unconnected story with a new villain begins for Barry Allen.

This could develop into an entertaining series, as long as you’re willing to forget about the more exciting story that started in DC Universe Rebirth and The Flash: Rebirth.

Jumping-on point rating: ● ● ○ ○ ○

Speaking of Batman…

3 panels from Batman: Rebirth #1

Batman: Rebirth #1

Language: English
Authors: Tom King and Scott Snyder (writers), Mikel Janín (artist), June Chung (colourist)
Publisher: DC
Cover date: August 2016
Pages: 20

Price: $2.99
Website: http://www.dccomics.com/comics/batman-2016/batman-rebirth-1

The story told in this comic is completely unrelated to DC Universe Rebirth. It feels like the epilogue to a previous story, but I don’t know how the New 52 Batman series ended. Batman fights an interesting supervillain, Calendar Man, then hires Duke Thomas as a new Robin (just don’t call him Robin), and performs some unlikely stunts. Reading The Flash and Batman side by side, it’s striking that both new sidekicks, ‘Wally West II’ and Duke Thomas, are African-Americans; however, both were created before Rebirth.

From here the Batman series splits into two new comics, All-Star Batman (written by the old Batman writer Scott Snyder) and Batman (written by Tom King). I picked the latter:

Batman #1

Language: English
Authors: Tom King (writer), David Finch (penciller), Matt Banning (inker), Jordie Bellaire (colourist)
Publisher: DC
Cover date: August 2016
Pages: 20

Price: $2.99
Website: http://www.dccomics.com/comics/batman-2016/batman-1

And once again, a completely new story (about Batman trying to avert a plane crash over Gotham and meeting two new rivalling superheroes) starts with no connection to either Batman: Rebirth or DC Universe Rebirth, except for the previously introduced Duke Thomas who makes a brief appearance here.

Even more so than The Flash #1, this comic book looks like a good jumping-on point if and only if you ignore the two Rebirth prequels.

Jumping-on point rating: ● ● ● ○ ○

Upcoming talk: Japanese art in the contact zone

Not directly comics-related, but hopefully relevant to anyone interested in manga readership outside Japan: later this week, I’m going to give a talk titled “Japanese Art in the Contact Zone: between Orientalism and ‘Japansplaining'” at the 3rd International Conference for PhD Students and Recent PhD Graduates in Belgrade on “Migrations in Visual Culture”. Below you’ll find the abstract as I had submitted it; in the meantime, I cut the examples of Takashi Murakami and manga/anime mentioned therein and made some other changes.

Hat tip to Nicholas Theisen on whose weblog What is Manga? I first encountered the beautiful word “Japansplain”!

Japanese Art in the Contact Zone: between Orientalism and ‘Japansplaining’

Whenever migrations of works of art and other artifacts become the subjects of scholarly analysis, those that originate in one culture and end up within a different culture are the ones that generate the most interest. Scholars who study such cross-cultural migrations operate within a methodological paradigm that has been shaped by theories such as Fernando Ortiz’s transculturation and, building upon it, Mary Louise Pratt’s contact zone.

These theories suggest that artifact-based communication between different cultures – including the reception of works of art – often takes place „in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power“ (Pratt). Such contexts have been strikingly examined by postcolonial studies, which identify these relations between colonising and colonised cultures, First and Third World countries, etc. Most famously, Edward Said located such a relation between Occident and Orient. The Far East, however, is where we find an example (though probably not the only one) that does not quite fit in this paradigm.

After WWII, Japan has come to be perceived as economically and politically on eye-level with its former enemy nations. The Japanese cultural industry is nowadays largely self-sufficient: as a rule, its products reach Western markets through a ‘pull’ rather than a ‘push’ mechanism, i.e. (some) Western consumers demand Japanese products, but Japanese producers and distributors are not desperate to break into an American or European market. Therefore, one cannot say that the Western reception of Japanese artworks takes place within a context of an asymmetrical power relation. Yet, this context is far from homogeneous. From the imagery of Takashi Murakami to the films of Akira Kurosawa, the photographs of Nobuyoshi Araki to manga and anime, Japanese artworks seem to divide European and American audiences into those who admire them, and those who cannot make sense of them.

In a way, these two audience groups reiterate the context of asymmetrical power relations, but in contrary ways: on the one hand, the ‘worshippers’ of Japanese art perceive it – and, by extension, the whole Japanese culture – as vastly superior to their own, up to the point where Japanese pedigree in itself becomes a decisive quality. The mode of reception in this group places Japan as the dominant culture, and its own Western culture as the subordinate. On the other hand, the ‘sceptics’ of Japanese art perceive it as inferior because they find it less accessible, thus reversing the power relation. The phenomenon of ‘Japansplaining’, i.e. attempting to explain Japanese culture (often in order to help make sense of Japanese works of art), works in both of these ways, and is at any rate an indicator of the perceived foreignness of Japanese art. This paper seeks to discuss this and the other aforementioned concepts related to the idea of the contact zone, and on that basis to critically examine the theoretical and methodological foundations underlying the study of cross-cultural migrations in visual culture.


The best Moon Knight ever? Review of Moon Knight (2016) #1-5

One of the many series recently rebooted by Marvel was Moon Knight, and as Moon Knight is a character I tend to follow (see my previous reviews of his series: Moon Knight (2011) #6-8 and #9-12, Moon Knight (2014) #1-3 and #4-6), I thought I’d give him another try.

panel from Moon Knight #1Language: English
Authors: Jeff Lemire (writer), Greg Smallwood (artist), Jordie Bellaire (colourist)
Publisher: Marvel
Pages per issue: 20
Price per issue: $3.99
Website: http://marvel.com/comics/series/20488/moon_knight_2016_-_present

Previously in Moon Knight: No idea what happened at the end of the previous series, because I dropped it when Warren Ellis left after only six issues. (Maybe I should have stuck to it, because it turns out Greg Smallwood’s artwork is almost as striking as Declan Shalvey’s who left the book shortly after Ellis…)

One of Moon Knight’s/Marc Spector’s defining characteristics is his precarious mental health, so it makes sense for Jeff Lemire to start the story with Marc being a patient – or should we say ‘inmate’? – in a mental hospital. Marc has these memories about being Moon Knight, but none about how he got there, and the hospital psychiatrist tells him that he has been there since he was twelve years old. Then again, he has these visions of his Egyptian patron deity, Khonshu, which suggest to him that the hospital staff are in fact other, evil Egyptian mythological beings.

Mental asylum break stories (if that’s a thing) are powerful when they manage to convey the feeling of despair in the protagonist: he or she is the only one who knows what’s really going on, but everyone else thinks he or she is just crazy (think Terminator 2: Judgment Day). This Moon Knight series adds the thrill of leaving the reader in the dark, at least initially, about which is the truth and which is Marc’s imagination: we are shown both the hospital staff and, alternately, the Egyptian gods, but only one of the two can be real (think David Cronenberg’s Spider).

One of the few things in which Ellis didn’t succeed in his run was the handling of Moon Knight’s backstory. Lemire achieves this by including several of Moon Knight’s supporting cast, and by putting more emphasis on his different personas (the millionaire, the taxi driver).

And then there’s the art. Often there are only few panels on a page, of different size and horizontally centered so that there is a lot of white space, giving a massive, iconic, grave and simply powerful impression. Some guest artists were involved in issue #5, which makes sense because each draws a different scene in a dream (?) sequence. Alas, from the solicitations it looks like Smallwood leaves the series after #6.

If there’s one thing I don’t like about this Moon Knight, it’s that the Egyptian gods often don’t talk like one would expect gods to talk, thus appearing less awe-inspiring than they could be. Granted, deities in the Marvel Universe are more mundane beings than the omnipotent gods from ‘real’ mythological tradition, but still…

All things considered, this might indeed be the best Moon Knight series ever, and (together with The Vision) the best Marvel book right now.

Rating: ● ● ● ● ○

Exhibition review: Pioneers of the Comic Strip, Frankfurt

Pioneers of the Comic Strip – A Different Avant-Garde (Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, until September 18, 2016) is an exhibition of six American newspaper comic artists whose strips started between 1904 and 1921. So instead of creators such as Rudolph Dirks or Richard F. Outcault who actually pioneered the comic strip form, curator Alexander Braun (who had also curated the Going West! exhibition) has selected artists who in some way could be considered avant-garde. The problem with the concept of the avant-garde in comics is that comics developed largely independently of modernist printmaking, draughtsmanship and other ‘high arts’. Nevertheless, this exhibition – hosted by a major fine art museum, after all – tries to find links between comics and avant-garde movements such as Expressionism and Surrealism, with varying success.

The first exhibit isn’t a comic but a film: Winsor McCay the Famous Cartoonist of the N. Y. Herald and His Moving Comics from 1911. Apart from that (and McCay’s Gertie the Dinosaur film), there are almost exclusively original newspaper pages and some original drawings on display. In other words, there are a lot of comics to read, which can be tiresome, but it’s better than the reproductions or book covers that one gets to see at other comic exhibitions. In some cases, they even managed to obtain the original drawings to corresponding newspaper pages and show them alongside each other.

Apparently McCay was included in the exhibition because he “can be considered the first Surrealist of the 20th century” (my translation). Salvador Dalí and René Magritte are also name-dropped in the text that accompanies McCays section of the exhibition. This is the central theme of the exhibition: all of the comic artists are judged by their relation to fine art and its avant-garde movements. The same is true for Lyonel Feininger, whose comic work is evaluated here as the job that had given him the financial freedom to pursue painting, and for Cliff Sterrett, whose stylistic changes in Polly and Her Pals are traced back to developments in high art (“echoes of the Bauhaus era” etc.).

The other three featured artists are George Herriman, Frank King, and, as the only really surprising choice, Charles Forbell. Forbell doesn’t even have a Wikipedia article, and apparently he only did a handful of episodes of his comic strip, Naughty Pete, in 1913. Each page is elaborately composed and lavishly coloured, but unfortunately he never used word balloons around his dialogue text. In some episodes he used different lettering styles for different characters, but in others it’s bothersome to figure out who says what. In a way, Naughty Pete is symptomatic of large parts of the exhibition: from a ‘high art’ perspective, one can see the avant-garde sensibility to it and why it was included in the exhibition, but from a comics perspective, it has neither been particularly influential nor is it actually that great a comic.

Rating: ● ● ● ○ ○
part of a Naughty Pete episode by Charles Forbell

Artifacts from Japan, part 4: Miyajima Misen Story manga

Miyajima Misen Story #3 coverThis 14,6 × 21 cm, 15-page manga leaflet is available for free at the ropeway station on Miyajima island. It’s the third part of a four-part story, but from what I gather, the manga is about a girl named Aki who visits several sights on Miyajima and runs into supernatural beings. Time travel might also play a role – the Japanese title on the cover says, 弥山へ。。。時の旅人, “time traveller to Misen” (Mt. Misen is the mountain on Miyajima to which the ropeway goes).

double page from Miyajima Misen Story #3Compared to regular, professional manga, the artwork might be a bit amateurish, but it’s still significantly better than what you would expect from what is essentially an advertisement comic issued by the Miyajima Ropeway company and created by locals from Hiroshima (writer: Yatarō Ichimonji, artist: Hitomi).

The four manga chapters are also available from the Miyajima Ropeway website as PDF files (Japanese only): part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4


Artifacts from Japan, part 3: Barefoot Gen wheat

barefoot gen grainWhen I bought this item at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, I had no idea what it actually was. Well, obviously it’s two ears of wheat sellotaped to a booklet with はだしのゲン / Barefoot Gen on the front. On the back there’s the first page of Keiji Nakazawa’s manga on which Gen and his father talk about growing crops, so the connection between wheat and Gen is made clear even to those who haven’t read the manga.

Inside there’s a fold-out leaflet with instructions on how to plant the wheat and raise it, as well as some information on Nakazawa, Gen and the atomic bombing. Enclosed there is also an envelope which can be used to send a message to be entered into the ‘Hiroshima Heart Database’  (http://ichinen-hokki.sakura.ne.jp/heartdatabase/, Japanese). The idea seems to be that one should grow wheat as a symbol of peace. At least some of the database entries reflect this (“As the wheat continues to grow, so will the awareness of peace” etc.).

Barefoot Gen wheat leaflet


Artifacts from Japan, part 2: Weekly Young Jump #27, 2016

Weekly Young Jump #27, 2016So this is the thing around which the whole manga industry revolves: the manga magazine.

Language: Japanese
Authors: various
Publisher: Shūeisha
Pages: 440
Price: ¥330 ($3.20 / €2.90)
Website: http://youngjump.jp/ (Japanese)

cover of Weekly Young Jump #27, 2016More precisely, this is a copy of the June 16 issue of 週刊ヤングジャンプ / Weekly Young Jump. Not quite as legendary as 週刊少年ジャンプ / Weekly Shōnen Jump by the same publisher, it is still a venerable manga anthology magazine that is sold at every convenience store.

Manga magazines are often said to be ‘phone book sized’, but that’s only true for the bigger monthly magazines. The smaller weekly ones like Young Jump are staple bound, measuring ‘only’ approximately 25,5 × 17 × 2 cm. This also means that the paper format is about 1.5 times larger than a tankobon.

The most obvious difference between Young Jump and Shōnen Jump is the ‘gravure idol’ on the cover of the former, advertising photo pages of young women in underwear at the beginning (in this issue: Anna Iriyama from AKB48, 8 pages) and end (Yūna Ego from SKE48, 6 pages) of the magazine. In other words, the cover is not representative of 97% of the content.

A page from Legend of the Galactic Heroes by Ryu Fujisaki. The poor printing shows particularly in panels with large black areas.

As for the manga pages, their printing quality really is abysmal – light grey ink on white paper, resembling printouts when the toner is about to run out, and guaranteed to come off on your hands. But most of the time it’s good enough to let you figure out what’s going on in the drawings.

An issue contains one chapter (usually 18 pages) from each of 20 different manga series, spanning various genres such as action, sports, and ecchi. The most noteworthy in this issue are:

  • キングダム / Kingdom by Yasuhisa Hara, a long-running samurai-era tale with somewhat sub-par artwork and over-the-top violence that seems to be quite popular at the moment;
  • ゴールデンカムイ / Golden Kamui by Satoru Noda, set in late Meiji-era Hokkaidō;
  • Terra Formars by Yu Sasuga and Kenichi Tachibana, a science-fiction story that has already been published in English and German;
  • 東京喰種:re / Tokyo Ghoul:re by Sui Ishida, a sequel to the popular supernatural horror manga;
  • 銀河英雄伝説 / Legend of the Galactic Heroes by Ryu Fujisaki (of Shiki fame), a new manga adaptation of an 80s science-fiction novel series;
  • 精密機械とてきと一人間 by NisiOisiN and Kei Takizawa, a 45 page one-shot about football;
  • 君と100回目の恋 / one hundred times I was fallin’ in love with you by Chocolate Records, Inabaseri and Kumichi Yoshizuki, a manga to promote an upcoming teenage pop music film of the same name.

In the past, Weekly Young Jump ran such famous series as Gantz, Elfen Lied, Liar Game, and All You Need Is Kill.

Thanks to manga magazines like Weekly Young Jump, manga readers in Japan (in contrast to most of those outside Japan) can decide whether to buy these and get their cheap ‘weekly (or monthly) fix’, or to ‘wait for the trade’ which is more expensive and of a smaller format but of a higher printing quality. Of course, the manga industry wants readers to first buy the magazines, then discard them and buy the tankobon too.